Greg Lindsay's Blog

June 10, 2017  |  permalink

Intel and the “Passenger Economy”

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Last week. Intel published a report on what it’s calling the “Passenger Economy” — the $7 trillion created by 2050 once the time, money, energy, and attention devoted to driving is channeled elsewhere in a world of autonomous vehicles. Working with Intel and the research firm Strategy Analytics, I was asked to imagine how this new economy larger than the UK’s and Germany’s combined today will begin to appear, and how it will reshape where and how we live, work and play. Ranging from “mobility-as-a-service” to aerial drone delivery to self-driving homes (as AVs mate with RVs), the autonomous future will transform cities — hopefully for the better.

The launch of the report (featuring my quotes) has been covered by WiredThe TelegraphThe Detroit News, CNBC, CNET, and Venture Beat, among many others. There’s also been significant international coverage in Singapore, Hong Kong, Germany, France, Italy, Spain, and Australia, to name just a few. Going forward, I’ll be writing and speaking about the report at Intel events in New York, Detroit, Washington and beyond. Stay tuned!

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Greg Lindsay is a journalist, urbanist, futurist, and speaker. He is a senior fellow of the New Cities Foundation — where he leads the Connected Mobility Initiative  — and the director of strategy for LACoMotion, a new mobility festival coming to the Arts District of Los Angeles in November 2017.

He is also a non-resident senior fellow of The Atlantic Council’s Strategic Foresight Initiative, a visiting scholar at New York University’s Rudin Center for Transportation Policy & Management, a contributing writer for Fast Company and co-author of Aerotropolis: The Way We’ll Live Next.

» More about Greg Lindsay

Blog

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“Columbus Park” and Redesigning Manhattan for Autonomous Vehicles.

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